This is where you will find our series of stories the feature cvc (consonant vowel consonant) words. Recognizing that students who are reading these stories may be coming in at different levels, these stories contain other sounds and some sight words. If your reader has been following along with the phonics in the order presented on this website there will be some words and sounds that they don’t know. That’s ok, you can help them with those words.

CVC Word Story #1

CVC Word Story #2

CVC Word Story #3

CVC Word Story #4

Who are these stories for?

These stories are for students who only know the phonics alphabet, but want to read something more robust. It’s also great for those same students who are starting to learn some sight words. If this is your child, then they should be able to read all of the cvc words in blue, and you can help them read the rest. I don’t recommend that they only read stories in this way, but this can be a nice change and a preview for them to see what they will be able to read if they keep working hard.

These stories are also for readers who are struggling with reading at their grade level, or struggling with blending. To put this into perspective a first grader should be able to read this story with limited difficulty by the middle of the year, and certainly by the end of the year (it’s ok if they don’t know a few words). Whether your child is struggling with reading or blending they should be able to read all of the cvc words in blue. That is always the goal with these stories.  You can also use them to gauge which sight words they need to learn. If they don’t know a sight word, just tell them the word and put it on a list of sight words for them to practice.

This story is also great for kids who know a lot of sounds, but are struggling with blending. I’ve said this before, but when it comes to helping a reader blend you want to dial back how much they are reading at a time. Find stories that are a comfortable length, and will only take them 20-30 minutes to read (this includes asking questions and talking bout the pictures). Also, it’s ok if they read stories that don’t have every sound that they know. In other words, let them read easier stories and master them before moving on to the hard stuff. I recommend making sure they can read 85-90 percent of the story with ease, otherwise it may become frustrating. Or if you know they don’t know any sight words, then tell them this is a story that you will read together. You can find easier stories on this site under “letter sound and blend words stories”. Or just go for it and see how then do. Depending on where they are they may need to read this story in two sessions. You’ll notice them start to make basic mistakes that they were’t making at the beginning of the story when they get tired. Don’t push, just tell them they did great, and let them read the rest tomorrow.

If your child is struggling with reading, I wouldn’t recommend doing this for more than 45 minutes. You’ll need to help them blend the words that they struggle with. Help them sound out the words, don’t just tell them what they are (unless they are sight words or sounds they don’t know). Make a note of the sounds they have difficulty on and later focus on making words with those sounds. For example if they have trouble reading the word dip. Show them how to sound it out d-ip, and then ask again, which sound is this…ip. What happens when we put an s in front of it ….sip, what happens when we put a t in front of it….tip.  And keep doing that for as many words as you can think of. A lot of kids see reading as a fun reward, so I like to put sounds that are featured in a story or sounds that they struggled with before the story, and go over them for about 10 minutes, and then read the story. I know it can be tough, but don’t get frustrated with your child if they keep making mistakes, just help them blend and move on. If they keep struggling with a sound, just add it to the list of things to practice.  I’m a big believer in meeting kids (or people) where the are. So if they are struggling with a sound, who cares, practice it for  few minutes a few times a week until they get it. Everyone can read, and they’ll get it in their own time. You’re just their guide who shows them what to work on.

Finally, this is also a great story for a student in the middle of first grade or later. By reading this story with them they can practice, and you can see which words they need to learn.

Sight words used in these stories

If your reader struggles with any of these words, just tell them what it is. They have to memorize them anyway, they’re sight words.

after, first, know, or, much, rain, way, day, may, give, live, a, the, to, I, go, do, like, we, was, for, are, we, be, he, me, my, by, she, her, you, have, all, so , no, have, said, keep , long, nice, ice, only, over, old, could, would, should, how, wow, now, walk, want, another, other, word, work, because, before, many, funny, any, every, very, about, again, were, where, thank, their, these, your, yours, hers, go, going, great, high, house, some, rough, tough, enough, through, write, more, been, also, learn, people, use, Dough, though, although, Wash, they, hey

Sounds used in these stories

ch, ck, dge, ph, sh, th, wh, wr, ee, ea, ai, ay (eigh), ey, oa, oe, oo, ow, ou, kn, nk, aw, ight, ie, eig, eigh, ei, igh, ey (ee), y, tch, oi, ar, ew, ui, er, an, ing, augh, all, ald, ay, it, ir, ur, or, ed, ci

CVC Word Story #1

CVC Word Story #2

CVC Word Story #3

CVC Word Story #4

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